Sample Gospel, Soul, and a Caribbean Touch by Freddy Gumbs

Inspiration

Sample Gospel, Soul, and a Caribbean Touch by Freddy Gumbs

Dutch Antillean singer Freddy Gumbs takes you from his mid-70s soul 45s to newer works heavily influenced by reggae, gospel, R&B, and local Caribbean music.

By

Tracklib

·

January 18, 2022

What was the recording of “When Things Go Wrong” like back in 1979?

I remember going to Trinidad along with five musicians to record this song, for an album I was working on. The vibe in the studio was good. I felt like we had a special track on our hands. My artistic work is very autobiographic and inspired by my daily life. “When Things Go Wrong” describes a specific issue I was having in a relationship at the time. While recording I went down memory lane and relived the experience…

How was it to collaborate with such a stellar line-up of musicians (Derrick Wright on drums, John Ginty on Hammond & Lesley Joseph on bass) for "When You've Gone"?

Working with exceptional musicians that have years of experience in their craft brought out the best in me! It's a very inspiring environment to be in, and we blended together perfectly.

1975’s “Minerva” is another beautiful soul cut from you. Which memories does that debut song bring you personally?

Minerva” is the cultivation of an intense love story. The year it was released, the song was a #1 hit and I received a gold record. That happened unexpectedly and said a lot about the
story I envisioned.

Your 1980 LP ‘Sweet Sugar Candy’ is much more upbeat and boasts Caribbean and reggae influences. Can you please tell us a bit about your main influences from those times?

I have a very versatile style. At the time of recording my album Sweet Sugar Candy, I was in the Caribbean and found myself inspired by the local music scene. I feel traveling as an artist is an experience that shifts your creative way of thinking. Especially when the environment hits close to home.

Freddy Gumbs

"To incorporate something that's been an inspiration within a creation of your own is also a token of respect."

—Freddy Gumbs

How has that versatile style developed from the mid-70s to now?

My roots have always been within gospel and soul music, so that will always be a reoccurring theme within my music. I experiment with different sounds and move along as time progresses, but the essence of my sound has stayed the same throughout the years.

As a recording artist yourself, what does sampling mean to you?

Sampling has become an important part of the music we love. We all get inspired by others, and sampling is an extension of this. To incorporate something that's been an inspiration within a creation of your own is also a token of respect.

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